Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Dublin Grand Canal1moonOn the common occasion that I cant get a successful night’s kip I’ll venture out into Dublin’s darkness and see what I can shoot. This helps me use all the unspent energy from the day in the hope that when I return to bed I can finally get my forty winks. I thought I’d share with you the images I have taken over the last year which helped me drift off into a deep coma.

_MG_1660 _MG_1864 Creepy Blue Buildings

Advertisements

Earlier in the year I ventured out into the Irish rain and tried to document the event of the summer.

In June Bavaria City Racing brought Formula 1 to the streets of Dublin. More than 100,000 spectators were expected to gather for an adrenaline-fuelled afternoon with Superbikes, Super cars, Touring cars, Formula 2, WRC, Drifters, and demonstrations from internationally celebrated F1 cars and drivers.

The map of the taken-over streets

f1

This is what I managed in the midst of the worst weather of the season._MG_6125_MG_6128

_MG_6139F1 McLaren wide1_MG_6157_MG_6237F1 Bavaria Dublin

I shot in three different locations. It was well worth the extra effort to talk to bar-owners in the city centre to let you up to the top of their buildings to allow you to shoot from above.

I found a great article on buying the older retro cameras on Ebay.

The trouble is, after you have read this you are going to be poor and partner-less.  On the brighter side, you will have an immense collection of the greatest light recording tools on the planet!

Enjoy.

“One thing I’m always amazed at is how some of the best cameras can be bought on ebay at great prices simply because few sellers spend just a few minutes cleaning up the cameras they find at garage sales or in the attic before photographing them and listing them.  The metal bodied cameras of the 1930’s through 1970s were built like battleships.  They clean up beautifully.  I’ve collected more than 150 cameras on ebay over the last 2 years and have had great luck in winning high quality equipment that I shoot at least a roll of film with each of them.

Somebody may consider this a sacriledge, but I clean up each and every one of them using baby wipes.  These things clean up everything from leather to metal and plastic parts.  and I have never seen it damage any camera with whatever chemicals are in the wipe.  Maybe some other brand might do damage, but I can vouch that the Kirkland brand from Costco does no harm and does a great job in taking off everything but corrosion.  Clean lens glass with proper lens cloths, though and use proper lens cleaning fluid (if you must) so you don’t take the delicate coating off lenses and mirrors.

Beyond that, one usually just needs to replace the light seals on most cameras and get the proper batteries and then you have a camera that takes great, razor sharp pictures.  The great news is that there are great sellers on ebay that sell light seal replacement kits and hard to find batteries.  I’ve bought from each of them on more than one occasion and have been very happy with their products.  I suppose the most common of the no-longer-available batteries is the 625 mercury cell that was commonly used in such popular cameras of the 1960’s and 1970’s like the Cannon FTb SLR, the Canonet Series of Rangefinder Cameras, The Nikkormat FTn, Nikon F, and the Minolta SRT Series of SLR’s.  Sure, there are ways to use hearing aid batteries to replace this no longer available button cel, but I’m a very satisfied user of the Wein Cel  MRB625 that provides the exact 1.35Volt power those cameras (and their meters) were designed to use.  Even though they are the zinc/air type they still last over a year in storage after the tab has been removed.  At about $6 per cel they are worth being able to use these classic cameras at their original specs.

Another great product to know about in restoring old cameras is Ronsonal Lighter Fuel.  Used sparingly, this is a wonderful solvent that frees stuck parts such as leaf shutters and aperture blades.  It is thought to be a very pure solvent that leaves little or no residue after it evaporates.  I’ve been able to take wonderful pictures with many seemingly hopeless cameras because this stuff loosened up the old lubricant in cameras that haven’t been used in decades.  Usually, there’s nothing else wrong with them”.

article by Ebay user impu1se82

 

This is what was delivered shortly after I read this

411703_309646805791686_395004149_o

And luckily, impressively, I’m still with my girl. Phew haha. Merry Christmas!

The street I live on has seen much change in years gone by. It has moved on from the days it was nicknamed “Little Jerusalem” to the vast ethnic diversity that can be seen there today. I decided to go up and down the Dublin city centre stretch and show the business’s from circa 1960 to present day.

1960 Eddie Thornton’s Grocery Store

img005

1964 Gregory Conlon’s Curio Shop

unowak061

1975 James and Seamus Traver’s of Travers Photography

unowak054

2001 Khuram Khan Business Solutions

unowak057

2009 Waqas Baig New Image Barber Shop

unowak056

2010 Pasha Khan Style and Style

img003

All image credits to Shuttermaniac.

In keeping with the family connection to explore the notion of how photography inspires us, I asked my sister to recall a story relating to a cousin of ours.

299822_181019178641774_1154915172_n

Lisa. My younger sister.

“My brother asked me to collaborate on his photography post series Monster Under The Bed as in our family we have all witnessed first-hand the superpower of the photograph. Lee sees the world through different eyes and shares his unique view with us all through his captivating photography. I also see the world differently with the help of photographs, and I’ll explain the reasons why”.

Using Photography as a Tool for Emotional Therapy;

Most of us will look through our collection of family photographs from time to time, and remember fondly (or not so in some cases!) the event or occasion that took place when the photograph was captured – reminding us of when it was taken, who we were with, what we were doing, how that event impacted our lives etc. Such reminiscence using photographs is often used as a form of therapeutic treatment in the care of elderly dementia patients, giving them a real sense of belonging, importance and of peace, in a time of difficulty. But it doesn’t stop there – many of us will use photographs for the same purpose, remembering happy times and helping us to maintain or improve our emotional wellbeing, and in coping with life’s challenges.

To put this into context, I’ll share my cousin’s story. By the age of just 15 he had tragically lost both of his parents, my own Aunt and Uncle. His photographs of them became a treasured collection of his memories, captured ‘forever’ in print. However, some years later a devastating house fire destroyed most of these images, leaving him with only one single photograph of his mum and dad together.  This photograph of course became extremely precious to him. He realised that any other photographs of his parents would be like gold dust to come by.

My mother knew she had a photograph of my cousin’s parents in an old album somewhere and wanted him to have it, but despite her hunting high and low and in all the nooks and crannies of every inch of her house, that wee photo completely eluded her grasp. She started to accept that perhaps she had lost this over the years of house moves and life moving on, but she never quite gave up on the idea of what that one single image could mean to my cousin. Very recently she uncovered an old box in her loft containing images from a lost era . One of which was the photograph of my cousin’s parents.

There was an extra sparkle clearly visible in this photograph – it didn’t only include his parents, but also showed that my Aunt was expecting company.

Image (76)

A simple photograph, and an innocent shot, from a family birthday party back in August 1980.

From the moment I called my cousin to let him know, to the excitement when I sent the email with the scanned photo attached, and to the day I received the text message from him telling me of the joy he felt to see that image– I became inherently aware of the superpower of the photograph – to bring happiness into someone’s world and sooth the delicate emotions from yesteryear. The earliest photograph of his existence so powerfully established in the simplest of their contemporary devices.  Respect fairly due to ‘the snapshot’. As Kodak’s earliest ad’s stated “You press the button, we do the rest”, Do we disagree?

Lisa Huggins.

To all budding Photojournalists, this is an interview with a man who has over 20 years experience as a Newspaper photographer.

 

 

And for those of you perhaps interested in Product or Fashion photography this is a really good interview with Ab Sesay. Which you should definitely watch till the end.

Here are three useful tutorials to set you on your way to developing your own film, printing your shots and then displaying your work. Go and make a cup of tea and give these wee videos a watch.